Roeen Roashan

Roeen Roashan

Roeen Roashan is a Senior Analyst in the Healthcare Technology research team. His specific area of coverage is digital health, where he has developed an industry-leading intelligence service on topics such as consumer medical devices, virtual healthcare and wearable technologies. Roeen has been quoted in Forbes, Fortune, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Le Monde and Al Jazeera.

Before joining IHS, Roeen held positions in analyst and consulting roles. Roeen received his BSc from Copenhagen Business School in Denmark, where he conducted research on NFC based mobile payment systems.

He received his MBA from California State University Long Beach in Long Beach, California. Roeen is based in Copenhagen, Denmark and joined IHS as an analyst in April 2013.


Contributions View All (44)

American Well and Samsung Health collaboration is great for the industry, but not transformative

With the launch of the highly anticipated S8 mobile handset, Samsung also renamed its health platform to “Samsung Health”. Beyond the standard health tracking and lifestyle management features, the company has enabled a deep integration of American Well’s telehealth services in its software. This is somewhat of a milestone for the virtual consultations market. American Well, as a third party service provider, has been available on most mobile platforms for a number of years, but the partnership with Samsung brings a completely new level of exposure – an exposure that should have a positive impact on the overall usage of virtual technology for doctor consultations.

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Healthcare Technology
Remote patient monitoring to include non-medical devices

The remote patient monitoring market has yet to reach its full potential, and since its inception, more than two decades ago, the technology has been overhauled on multiple occasions. Another revamp is undergoing right now, as vendors are expanding the ecosystem of devices included in the actual monitoring. Last week, Medtronic Care Management Service announced the integration of Garmin’s activity tracker series, Vivofit, into its remote patient monitoring platform. Meanwhile, iHealth Labs is entering the market after its acquisition of eDevice in September last year. Since the acquisition, the two companies have been working on the so-called “iHealth Next” solution – a combination of iHealth’s suite of devices in conjunction with eDevice’s infrastructure for remote patient monitoring. It is expected that iHealth Next also supports non-medical devices such as activity monitors.

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Healthcare Technology
What happens after self-diagnosis?

The insufficient number of physicians in the world, and growing demand for healthcare services, has led many initiatives that drive the enablement of consumers to self-diagnose at home. Last week, Final Frontier Medical Devices and Dynamical Biomarkers Group went head to head, as the Xprize finalists, competing to create a medical tricorder. Final Frontier Medical Devices came in at the top spot with its DxtER solution, which weighs less than five pounds, but can diagnose 34 health conditions. However, one key question is whether healthcare sectors are ready for self-diagnosis. Surely, the growing level of responsibility from patients will improve patient engagement, but do healthcare sectors have the capacity to attend to self-diagnosed patients, given that these diagnoses are clinically valid?

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Healthcare Technology
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